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Slashgeo wants to be the best user-friendly and community-driven online resource for news and discussions about GIS, Remote Sensing and everything geospatial.
Updated: 36 weeks 1 day ago

Batch Geonews: 25m European DEM, OpenLayers 3 vs Google Maps API v3, GeoMedecine, and much much more

Wed, 12/18/2013 - 17:11

Here what's probably our latest geonews in batch mode entry for 2013, have a nice holiday break!

From the open source / open data front:

From the Esri front:

From the Google front:

In the everything-else category:

In the maps category:

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Releasing data really works, Part V

Sun, 12/15/2013 - 11:26

Bloggage update: It took five days (after hours) to stand up, learn, tweak and display my East Anglia Fenlands project on Mapcentia's web service. It started with a GISuser group post on LinkedIn on Monday, I used my Amazon Web Service free EC2 trial and GeoCloud2 under beta, and by Friday I had it working and styled. No small thanks to Martin Hogh's original work and help, the result is a simple yet modern and pleasing web map. Not only can I serve up the results of my round-trip Ordnance Survey polygon corrections, but I can also serve up my East Anglia Fenlands project quickly and effectively.

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OGC World Weather Symbols 0.5.0 Released

Mon, 12/02/2013 - 16:17

Almost everything geospatial deals with symbols on maps or other types of displaying mechanism. Here's a new source of symbols coming from the OGC MetOcean DWG, the 'World Weather Symbols' available on GitHub.

It is described as "A complete set of WMO weather symbols in SVG with full metadata." It's not a version 1.0, but they are fully usable right away and there's "A set of pre-generated PNGs are available for download [...]". From the same source you can get the 'World Meteorological Organization - Regional Associations' (WMO-RA) in geojson, which is vector data representing the "Six regional associations are responsible for the coordination of meteorological, hydrological and related activities within their respective Regions [...]".

Other openly available geospatial-related symbols sources that I'm aware of include:

Any other pertinent source?

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Batch Geonews: New Maki Icons, OpenStreetMap News, Ads in Your Google Maps Maps, ArcGIS Online Update Coming, and much more

Fri, 11/29/2013 - 17:57

Here's the recent geonews in batch mode.

From the open source / open data front:

From the Esri front:

From the Google front:

In the everything else category:

In the maps category:

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Esri GeoFences with the New Geotrigger Service

Fri, 11/29/2013 - 17:12

Apple, Google and others have been offering geofencing-related services for a while, and now Esri solidifies their offer with the public beta version of Esri's Geotrigger Service.

From the official entry: "How does the Geotrigger Service work? An invisible area drawn on a map is set to have an action or message associated with it. When your mobile device crosses into the “trigger zone” the Geotrigger Service sends a location-based message to that device, or even notifies your server for custom events. [...] The Geotrigger Service runs in the cloud. [...] Free while in beta."

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Yann Arthus-Bertrand's 'Earth From Space' Book

Wed, 11/27/2013 - 13:31

For some of us, it's already time to think about Christmas gifts. Here's a new nice 'geo' book released earlier this month, it's Yann Arthus-Bertrand's Earth from Space, which includes 150 breathtaking satellite images. Wired shares 12 satellite images from the book - worth taking a look.

The book description: "From space, Earth is a magnificent sight, splashed with vivid colors, patterns, textures, and abstract forms. Views from above can also provide telling information about the health of our planet. To help us understand the more than 150 breathtaking satellite photographs in Earth from Space, Yann Arthus-Bertrand, an aerial photographer and devoted environmental activist, discusses the impact of deforestation, urban sprawl, intensive farming, ocean pollution, and more. Using high-resolution imagery, we can monitor the evolution of vegetation around the Chernobyl nuclear disaster site, snow loss on Mount Kilimanjaro, and the health of migratory bird populations. Earth from Space’s compelling selection of satellite images raises important questions about our future, while also showcasing the planet’s beauty—leaving no doubt that it is something crucial to protect."

 

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Galileo Navigation System Gets Go-Ahead From EU Parliament

Fri, 11/22/2013 - 10:40

We actually mentioned Europe's answer to GPS, Galileo, in 2005. Yesterday the following story was discussed over Slashdot, Galileo Navigation System Gets Go-Ahead From EU Parliament.

Their summary: "Plans to start up the EU's first global satellite navigation system (GNSS) built under civilian control, entirely independent of other navigation systems and yet interoperable with them, were approved by MEPs on Wednesday. Both parts of this global system — Galileo and EGNOS — will offer citizens a European alternative to America's GPS or Russia's Glonass signals. The Galileo system could be used in areas such as road safety, fee collection, traffic and parking management, fleet management, emergency call, goods tracking and tracing, online booking, safety of shipping, digital tachographs, animal transport, agricultural planning and environmental protection to drive growth and make citizens' lives easier."

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Happy GIS Day 2013

Wed, 11/20/2013 - 15:22

Being busy is no excuse to wish everybody an happy GIS Day! You can learn more about it on gisday.com and on Wikipedia. And while we're at it, the Geography Awareness Week webpage on National Geographic's website.

Let's quote Wikipedia: "GIS Day is a grassroots educational event that enables geographic information systems (GIS) users and vendors to open their doors to schools, businesses, and the general public to showcase real-world applications of GIS. GIS Day is a global event. Organizations all over the world that use GIS, or are interested in GIS, participate by holding or sponsoring an event of their own. In 2005 more than 700 GIS Day events were held in 74 countries around the globe. The first GIS Day occurred in 1999. GIS Day is held the third Wednesday of November each year, during Geography Awareness Week, a geographic literacy initiative sponsored by the National Geographic Society."

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Leaflet 0.7 Released and Plans for Leaflet's Future

Tue, 11/19/2013 - 10:18

The open source lightweight web mapping library Leaflet quickly became very popular in the past year or so, and now there's Leaflet version 0.7 released for us to play with.

From the announcement: "This is a bugfix-heavy release — as Leaflet becomes more and more stable feature-wise, the focus shifts towards stability, usability and API improvements over new features. [...] You can check out the detailed changelog of what’s already done over the recent months for 0.7 (about 90 improvements and bugfixes) [...] There are several big undertakings in refactoring Leaflet that I’d want to switch to immediately after releasing 0.7 — I’ve been holding them off for too long, and they’ll be extremely beneficial for plugin and Leaflet-based API authors." The full list is available in their announcement.

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Batch Geonews: Remaining Relevant as a GIS Professional, OpenGeo Suite 4.0, 30TB of Imagery in Esri, and much more

Wed, 11/13/2013 - 10:22

Here's the recent geonews in batch mode, covering a too long timespan once again.

On the open source / open data front:

On the Esri front:

On the Google front:

In the everything-else category:

In the maps category:

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CLAVIN (Cartographic Location And Vicinity INdexer) Version 1.0 Released

Tue, 11/12/2013 - 17:46

We mentioned the project before, and via APB I learned that the open source CLAVIN has released its version 1.0.

From the official page: "CLAVIN (Cartographic Location And Vicinity INdexer) is an award-winning open source software package for document geotagging and geoparsing that employs context-based geographic entity resolution. It extracts location names from unstructured text and resolves them against a gazetteer to produce data-rich geographic entities. CLAVIN does not simply "look up" location names – it uses intelligent heuristics to identify exactly which "Springfield" (for example) was intended by the author, based on the context of the document. CLAVIN also employs fuzzy search to handle incorrectly-spelled location names, and it recognizes alternative names (e.g., "Ivory Coast" and "Côte d'Ivoire") as referring to the same geographic entity. By enriching text documents with structured geo data, CLAVIN enables hierarchical geospatial search and advanced geospatial analytics on unstructured data."

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Releasing geodata really works, Part IV

Mon, 11/04/2013 - 09:07

Bloggage update: Over a year ago I QC'd UK Ordnance Survey data for East Anglia, and sent the polyline spike and kickback errors to the Agency, who posted the corrections this year. They noted the errors I reported fell below their own QC criteria, but they invited me to retest their updated dataset.  If results were very good in 2010, with 25 errors out of 1777 polygons, they were even better in the 2013 update at only 1 spike out of 1779 polygons! Again, making public data available does help spur on data improvements, and online data validation helps identify errors quickly and efficiently. This makes it easier for the public to communicate, and for data custodians to high-grade their holdings.

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Google Geonews: Introduction of Google Maps Engine Pro along with several Connectors, Google Glass News, and more

Wed, 10/30/2013 - 10:45

Here's the recent Google-related geonews.

From official sources:

From other sources:

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Mozilla Location Service: Geolocation Lookups From Cell Towers and Public WiFi Data

Tue, 10/29/2013 - 17:06

(sorry for the recent down time and geonews hiatus, we'll be back to full speed soon!)

Yesterday Mozilla announced their own location services, here's a discussion named Mozilla Location Service: Geolocation Lookups From Cell Towers and WiFi Data.

The slashdot summary: "Mozilla today launched an experimental pilot project called Mozilla Location Service. The organization explains its goal is to provide geolocation lookups based on publicly observable cell tower and WiFi access point information. Mozilla admits that many commercial services already exist in this space, but it wants to provide a public one. The company points out there isn't a single 'large' public service that provides this data, which is becoming increasingly important when building various parts of the mobile ecosystem."

You can also learn more from the actual announcement and the blog entry with details. And of course, you want to see the coverage map, right?

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GeoExt 2.0.0 Released

Tue, 10/29/2013 - 16:54

The GeoExt community is proud to announce the release of GeoExt 2.0.0.

Download it at https://github.com/geoext/geoext2/releases/tag/v2.0.0

GeoExt 2.0.0 is the first official GeoExt version that is built atop of OpenLayers 2.13.1 and ExtJS 4.2.1. It is being released 2 weeks after release candidate 1 was published and no serious bugs were discovered.

The newest major version of GeoExt wants to provide mostly the same API you know and love from the 1.x-series. It comes with support for the autoloading-mechanism of ExtJS, support for the single-file build tool of sencha and with exhaustive documentation that is built using the same tools that the mother library ExtJS uses (see http://geoext.github.io/geoext2/docs/ and http://geoext.github.io/geoext2/docs-w-ext/).

This release wouldn't have been possible without the sponsors of the above mentioned sprint. Also we want to thank the companies behind the contributors of GeoExt for supporting GeoExt development in numerous ways and for such a long time.

We invite you all to use GeoExt 2!

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The iPhone’s Positioning Sensors Were Never Good

Tue, 10/22/2013 - 09:17

Tidbits published a short story named The iPhone’s Positioning Sensors Were Never Good that summarizes the recent findings regarding smartphones accuracy of their positioning sensors, specifically the level, gyroscope, compass and accelerometer.

From the article: "Some were off as much as 20 degrees, and the worst deviation came in three different iPhone 5 units. TechHive also tested the compass of the Android-powered LG G2 smartphone and found that it was the closest to the Suunto, off by only 3 to 4 degrees. [...] In short, despite the proven problems, the iPhone’s positioning sensors still work sufficiently well for the uses that most people demand of them."

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HALE 2.7.0 for Spatial Data Harmonisation Now Available

Mon, 10/21/2013 - 09:13

HALE is an open source solution that brings interactive visual decision support to schema transformation projects, such as providing INSPIRE-compliant geodata.

With the new 2.7.0 release  (downloadsdocumentation), we have added the following core features, plus a host of smaller improvements:

Project Templates

To make the start with HALE easier, HALE now offers the possibility to use project templates, e.g. for mapping to the INSPIRE Application Schemas. This saves you steps such as loading the schemas and setting up codelists. You can share your own projects as templates, example, or even as reference mappings online, to let others in your community profit from them:

http://hale.igd.fraunhofer.de/templates/

The Join Retype operation

HALE now offers attribute based joins of different feature classes – to an arbitrary depth.

Export to JSON/GeoJSON

Transformed data can now be exported to JSON or GeoJSON, independently of what kind of schema the data is associated to. Objects are generically encoded as JSON/GeoJSON according to their structure.

Improved support for INSPIRE

HALE now supports the new code list XML format introduced recently by the INSPIRE registry. These code lists are relevant for the latest versions of the Annex II and III Application Schemas. In addition, transformed INSPIRE compliant features can now be saved to GML directly as an INSPIRE SpatialDataSet instead of the deprecated GML FeatureCollection.

To learn more about HALE, visit http://blog.dhpanel.eu

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Releasing data really works, part III

Sun, 10/20/2013 - 08:46

Bloggage update: More and more free data are available that are quality-controlled and verifiable. Guardian Data Blog's @smfrogers (now at Twitter) was quite sanguine about this: "Comment is free, but facts are sacred". This reflects the geo-industry's credo is "say what you want, but ensure your data's Triple-A rating: available, accurate and auditable."

Guardian Data posted Great Britain's train station data, and they used Google Fusion Tables to post some of the data. I downloaded the data set, mapped it against UK post code data from Doogal UK to place stations at post code centerpoints, and classified it by year and frequency. UK Ordnance Survey County and District data, and NOAA GSHHS coastal outline subset completed the picture. The maps were created on ArcMap for Home Use. then posted on arcgis.com. giscloud.com loader for ArcMap data was then used to post it online here and below, together with USGS SRTM web map service for background.

This is yet another example where posting data and making it publicly available can move forward map making through mashups of various data sources. The key proviso, however, is that data sources are acknowledged all the way. Not only will it allow auditing and referral, but it also allows others to create more of the same according to their particular expertise. Isn't that, after all, what crowdsourcing is all about?

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Batch Geonews: Esri's FileGDB Reversed-Engineered, China to Rent 5% of Ukraine, U.S. Government Shutdown Map, and much more

Tue, 10/15/2013 - 10:26

The recent geonews in batch mode:

From the open source / open data front:

From the Esri front:

From the Google front:

In the miscellaneous category:

In the maps category:

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Slashgeo is a proud media partner of the 9th International gvSIG Conference

Fri, 10/11/2013 - 15:46

This year again Slashgeo will be a proud media partner of the 9th International gvSIG Conference to be held from November 27th to 29th 2013 in Valencia, Spain.

From their objectives: "So what does this have to do with technology? Everything! In the XXI century, can anyone imagine technology as not part of strategic sectors? There is practically no activity or progress, whether industrial, social or within the business environment where technology is not a fundamental aspect. In this sense, and by following the example of where sovereignty lies, whether with the people or within the financial markets, what we need to ask ourselves is whether we govern technology or if technology governs us. [...] We are again talking about the need of having access to knowledge, and when it comes to software, knowledge is only possible if we are talking about free software, which provides us with technological independence, which enables us to at least aspire to be Sovereign. It is a Matter of Sovereignty, which is the main idea that we are claiming in the 9th International gvSIG Conference in Valencia."

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